Recognize Addictions

Identifying an addiction problem can be a challenge. Addicts are often able to hide their behavior, even from those close to them. In addition, what may seem like an addiction could be an experimental phase or how a particular man copes with stress. But addiction is chronic and usually degenerative, or worsens over time. Without help in the early phases, an addiction might turn into a debilitating and life-threatening condition. No matter which kind of addiction, it is crucial to recognize warning signs and seek help if necessary.

Early Stages

In the early stages, a man might not show revealing signs of addiction. In regards to common behaviors such as smoking or drinking, it may be that a man is simply using a substance socially or casually. Therefore, it can be hard to tell if the behavior is unhealthy or how long it may last. Even in the early stages, however, some hints may be present.
Signs include:

• being especially drawn to a substance or activity
• seeking out situations where the substance or activity is present
• episodes of loss of control or bingeing

Alienation

Once a man moves past experimenting or the early phase of addiction, he will likely begin to alienate family and friends, pushing away those who care about him. Addicts have a tendency to surround themselves only with people who either encourage or imitate their addictive behavior. An addict usually won’t put himself in social situations where he can’t use his chosen substance.

At first, alienation may be rare, but it will typically advance over time. An addict will try to hide the addictive behavior from loved ones—especially those who may try to stop it. It is common for addicts to completely cut off contact with their families, friends, spouses, or children. They will ignore text messages, avoid phone calls, and sometimes even refuse to answer the door.

Declining Health

Another way to recognize addiction is to observe the man’s health. Whether the addiction is to a drug or behavior, the addict’s health will nearly always deteriorate. Persistent illness, injuries, or chronic fatigue could be signs of a problem. The hair, skin, nails, and teeth of an addict may also be in poor condition. This is especially true when he is abusing illegal drugs such as cocaine or methamphetamine. The man may also have an unusual sleep schedule or will miss work and other important responsibilities. The man’s emotional and mental health may also suffer.
The following might be signs of a problem:

• sudden mood changes
• hostile behavior
• irritability
• depression
• indifference
• suicidal thoughts

Generally, if other factors contributing to physical or mental health issues do not occur, it is probable that a substance abuse or other addiction problem exists.

Downward Spiral

In the middle or later stages of an addiction, the addict will experience negative results from the addiction. These consequences might be limited to an addict’s personal life, but could include legal or professional problems as well.
Some common effects include:

• poor grades or dropping out of school
• neglecting important duties or missing work
• strained relationships with family and friends
• worsening reputation
• injuries, accidents, or hospitalizations due to addictive behavior
• arrests or jail time
• eviction from the home or missed mortgage payments
• job loss
• loss of parental rights

While similar issues can occur in the lives of non-addicted people, these can become more common when an addiction is present. It is important to determine whether the problem is a result of a single incident or a growing problem with the addiction.

Excuses

Despite the concern of family and friends, an addict will nearly always deny the seriousness of his addiction. Making excuses is common among addicts. Whether or not they know they are addicted, they will deny it to others. The man will usually have many reasons to excuse his behavior.

While a non-addicted person can usually see a negative behavior and eliminate it, this isn’t the case with an addict. Instead of admitting that the problem exists, addicts must convince themselves and others why it is acceptable to continue the behavior. This is why an intervention or trying to force an addict into treatment often fails. Until an addict “hits rock bottom” and wants help, he won’t be able to admit that he needs assistance. In most cases, an addict must want to change in order for recovery to be successful.

Frequently Asked Questions

 

HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO BE A RESIDENT?

John 3:16 Ministries is free. Jesus Christ has paid the price. Operations are funded by churches, private donations, and benefits.

ARE THERE ANY AGE REQUIREMENTS FOR RESIDENTS?

Residents must be 21 or older and must be physically able to perform labor and tasks.

HOW LONG IS THE PROGRAM?

John 3:16 Ministries is a long-term program, with most men staying six months to one year.

CAN A RESIDENT RECEIVE VISITS FROM FAMILY AND/OR FRIENDS?

Residents must wait 28 days before receiving any visits. After the 28-day waiting period, they may receive visits on Sunday from 9:15 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. from approved visitors.

I HAVE AN ACQUAINTANCE WHO NEEDS HELP. HOW CAN I RECOMMEND HIM FOR RESIDENCY?

To recommend a resident, please call us at 870-799-2525 or visit our contact page.

WHAT ARE THE CRITERIA FOR BECOMING A RESIDENT OF JOHN 3:16?

A person must contact us, sick and tired of their addictions, seeking help and displaying honesty and sincerity about their desire for assistance.

MY QUESTION ISN’T ANSWERED HERE. WHO CAN I CALL FOR HELP?

Please call our office at 870-799-2525 with any additional questions you may have.

Address

75 Holmes Rd
Charlotte, AR 72520

Talk With Us

Call: (870) 799-2525
Email: info@john316thecure.com

Working Hours

Mon – Fri: 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Sat: 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM